Official Bell Homestead NHS Website, City of Brantford

Pay Us a Call at Melville House! 

This sturdy homestead was the site of one of the most important scientific breakthroughs in history.  On July 26th, 1874, the young Alexander Graham Bell sat in the dale here, in a spot he called his "dreaming place", and pondered the quest for a "speaking telegraph".  As he stared down at the Grand River that warm summer day, inspiration struck: Bell grasped the principle on which his most famous invention, the telephone, would work.  On a subsequent visit to his parents here two years later, he mounted one of the three crucial public demonstrations that proved the telephone was a practical form of communication.  Bell's invention would reshape the world.

These momentous events created such affection for this mid-Victorian farm that in 1909 the Bell Telephone Memorial Association purchased the property and deeded it to the Brantford Board of Park Management, for use in perpetuity as a public parkland and memorial of the invention of the telephone in Brantford.  The Bell Homestead, as it quickly came to be known, opened its door to the public for the first time in 1910.

This is a picture of Bell Homestead Museum

For a century, the Homestead has welcomed visitors from far and wide.  As one of Ontario's oldest historic home museums, it has grown significantly in that time, with three restored historic buildings and an eclectic collection of original Bell family artifacts.  Together they tell the story of how a young teacher of the deaf came to invent the telephone.